Desktop Metal Shop System

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Metal 3D printing has been firmly stuck in the land of highly customized one-off production parts and prototyping, like rocket engine parts. Almost all metal 3D printers can not get anywhere near the speed needed to create mass production parts. But that changes with the capabilities of the Desktop Metal Shop System. This is the first metal binder jetting system designed for the machine shop. The DM Shop System is a powder bed based, inkjet technology that allows for mass […]

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Desktop Metal 3D Printing Process – Debinding

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In the last post we went over how the Desktop Metal 3D printing process can print larger parts than can be made with the metal injection molding (MIM) method. This is due to the ability of it to print parts with a hollow infill and how the debinding process works.   Before the parts can move onto to the furnace to be sintered, they need to have to binding agents removed from them. This is done in a liquid chemical […]

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Desktop Metal Printing Process – Printing

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  The Desktop Metal Printing process allows you to produce solid metal parts, in-house, in an office environment. The entire process is based off the metal injection molding process, or MIM. The MIM process involves making tooling to inject a metal powder/polymer/binder mixture into the desired shape. The parts are in a ‘green’ state and not full strength yet. Then the part is put through a debinder tank of liquid, to remove the binding agent from the metal, leaving the […]

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Desktop Metal Releases H13 Tool Steel Material

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ABOUT THE MATERIAL Tool steel refers to a variety of carbon and alloy steels that are particularly well suited for toolmaking. Their suitability comes from their distinctive hardness, resistance to deformation, and their ability to hold a cutting edge at elevated temperatures. As a result, tool steels are well suited to shape other materials. Characterized by its stability in heat treatment, H13 is a chromium molybdenum hot work steel well known for its exceptional hot hardness and abrasion resistance. That […]

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Fabricate Release Notes – Version 1.16

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Version 1.16 New Features & Enhancements Job status can now be updated from the Job History. When resending a Job History, the job will be rolled back to sending and will trigger a send of the same job to the device. The job is removed from display on the dashboard. Deleting a model from the Models page now deletes all related Intellectual Property for that model, including g code and images. More Furnace nesting improvements. Updated the ultra high profile […]

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Fabricate 1.15 release notes

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New Features and Enhancements Parts with the same advanced settings can now be printed together Now warns user when trying to print a part greater than 80mm x 80mm x 80mm with a 250 micron nozzle Now warns user when uploading a model that is too small to print User is now advised prior to printing when a part or job exceeds operating conditions for printing, debinding or sintering Usability improvements in part to support slider Improved sinter time and […]

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What is Local Fabriacate for Desktop Metal?

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As cloud-based software, FabricateTM maintains a secure connection to Desktop Metal servers at AWS. However, we understand that some customer environments face security restrictions that require all computation and data to be kept on-premises. For this reason, we have developed a local version of Fabricate. A local Fabricate installation allows you to use many of the same features found in the cloud-based Fabricate software, including job setup and management,  without requiring a connection to the cloud. Local Fabricate lets you manage […]

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Desktop Metal: X/Y Calibration

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The X/Y Calibration on a Desktop Metal 3D Printer is intended to calibrate the offset between the metal and interface extruders. The process consists of printing a series of metal lines and then printing interface atop those metal lines. The user then visually inspects the location of the interface lines and enters the found values to the user interface screen on the printer. Notes: X/Y Calibration is required upon the first print X/Y Calibration may also be run if you […]

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Desktop Metal Studio System: 3D-Printed Flexures

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The Desktop Metal Studio System+ offers not only the convenience of office-friendly 3D printing, but the ability to 3D-print metal flexures. Flexure: (n.) A flexible feature (or combination of elements) within a part, engineered to be compliant in specific degrees of freedom. Background Flexures are used for precise adjustment in devices like optical stages and actuating clamps—such as collets and compliant features—where minimizing backlash is critical. Based on their geometric complexity, fine features, and susceptibility to vibration, flexure designs are challenging […]

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Desktop Metal Dimensional Accuracy & Surface Finish

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The Desktop Metal process is designed to provide “near net shape” parts that achieve tolerances comparable to casting. When tight tolerances or smooth surface finishes are required, users should expect to employ secondary operations (milling, grinding, polishing, etc.). Studio System parts are currently achieving tolerances of +/- 0.5 mm for parts less than 60 mm. (+/- 0.02 in for parts less than 2.3 inches), or between 0.8% and 2%. This means that a 1” part should be 1″ +/- 0.02”, and a […]

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