Desktop Metal: X/Y Calibration

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The X/Y Calibration on a Desktop Metal 3D Printer is intended to calibrate the offset between the metal and interface extruders. The process consists of printing a series of metal lines and then printing interface atop those metal lines. The user then visually inspects the location of the interface lines and enters the found values to the user interface screen on the printer. Notes: X/Y Calibration is required upon the first print X/Y Calibration may also be run if you […]

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Desktop Metal Studio System: 3D-Printed Flexures

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The Desktop Metal Studio System+ offers not only the convenience of office-friendly 3D printing, but the ability to 3D-print metal flexures. Flexure: (n.) A flexible feature (or combination of elements) within a part, engineered to be compliant in specific degrees of freedom. Background Flexures are used for precise adjustment in devices like optical stages and actuating clamps—such as collets and compliant features—where minimizing backlash is critical. Based on their geometric complexity, fine features, and susceptibility to vibration, flexure designs are challenging […]

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Desktop Metal Dimensional Accuracy & Surface Finish

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The Desktop Metal process is designed to provide “near net shape” parts that achieve tolerances comparable to casting. When tight tolerances or smooth surface finishes are required, users should expect to employ secondary operations (milling, grinding, polishing, etc.). Studio System parts are currently achieving tolerances of +/- 0.5 mm for parts less than 60 mm. (+/- 0.02 in for parts less than 2.3 inches), or between 0.8% and 2%. This means that a 1” part should be 1″ +/- 0.02”, and a […]

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Desktop Metal Studio System Design Guideline Highlights

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With the release of Desktop Metal’s new Studio System, we wanted to publish some highlights of the design guidelines developed by Desktop metal in order to ensure success on your new metal printing system. By following these guidelines, you will be creating part designs that are best suited to utilize the strengths of the Studio System while at the same time minimizing the impact of the process limitations inherent to the tech behind the Studio System. All these design guidelines […]

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3D Scanning: Using a Work In Progress (WIP) Model with a Roland CNC

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Creaform 3D Scanners can be used for many more things beyond quality control/inspection of parts or reverse engineering existing parts. With more uses comes less downtime on your Creaform scanner resulting in a better return on investment. One of the less prominent areas you can use your scanner for is to make a ‘Work In Progress’ (WIP) model for use with CNC machining. Sometimes when machining you will have a part that is part way machined from the stock but not […]

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Testing 17-4 ph Stainless Steel from Desktop Metal

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Out of my own curiosity, I wanted to see how our printed stainless steel compared to common production stainless steel like 304. I took a few samples to a friends shop and talked about what I wanted to do and off we went. First, 304 is probably one of the most common general use steels made and used in industry. 17-4 is a bit more specialized but its most sought-after features are its high strength and corrosion resistance. This is […]

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SOLIDWORKS 2019 What’s New – Configuring the Precision of Dimensions and Tolerances – #SW2019

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Controlling the precision of dimensions in SOLIDWORKS has always been integral to capturing design intent and ensuring the finished part will be manufactured within tolerance. In certain cases, a critical dimension and/or tolerance might require different precision from one configuration to another due to a change in material or manufacture method. Previously, this information would have required two separate parts to capture. In SOLIDWORKS 2019, you can now directly configure precision. From the Dimension PropertyManager, specify a desired tolerance and […]

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DESIGN FOR 3D PRINTING – Tips, Tricks & Techniques Part 2 of 3

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Designing for Additive Manufacturing can be somewhat different than designing for traditional Subtractive processes (Mills, Lathes, etc.) We will break this down into 3 parts that impact your design, Design Considerations (part 1), Exporting Data (part 2) and Build Preparation (part 3). In Part 1 we discussed Design Considerations. In this blog let’s take a detailed look at the next step – Exporting the Data. This can be equally important to define the form, fit and function intended for the […]

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What I learned at AMUG (2018 Edition)

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In mid April of this year, myself and other members of the Hardware Sales and Application team made the short trek to the St. Louis Union Station for the 30th annual AMUG conference. AMUG is first and foremost a User Group for users and operators of additive equipment to come together to learn from one another. This is the only place I would feel comfortable in talking to vendors and manufacturers of competitive equipment and ask them how it works. […]

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3D CAD Design For 3D Printing – Tips, Tricks, & Techniques – Part 1 of 3

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Designing for Additive Manufacturing can be somewhat different than designing for traditional subtractive processes (Mills, Lathes, etc.). We will break this process down into three parts that impact your design. The three parts will focus on Design Considerations (part 1), Exporting Data (part 2) and Build Preparation (part 3). As a designer you have numerous design considerations for your creation. However, for Additive Manufacturing (AM) let’s just concentrate on these three design considerations that make a difference in 3D Printing; […]

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