SOLIDWORKS 2020 What’s New – Thermal Loads for Beam Elements

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In SOLIDWORKS Simulation, beam elements are quite common. They offer robust results on long, slender structural members without the compromising solve times that would be required with solid or shell type elements. However, beams have always had a major drawback; they cannot take thermal loads. This was a severe limitation, as many types of structures made from beams may be required to endure large temperature variations. This has been remedied in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 with the addition of Thermal Loads […]

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SOLIDWORKS 2020 What’s New: Simulation – Distributed Coupling for Pins and Bolts

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In many FEA studies using SOLIDWORKS Simulation, the use of pins and bolts are common. They are a great way to restrain assemblies realistically while managing setup difficulty and solve times. SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2020 is releasing with a new formulation for bolts and pins, called the distributed coupling. To understand this new functionality, let’s do a quick review of these connectors. At the end of the day, bolt and pin connectors consist of 2 elements. The first is a beam […]

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SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation: HVAC Module Part 1 – Tracer Study

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Predicting the way that fluids behave and mix inside a closed space can be a difficult undertaking. Every day we are at the mercy of the HVAC systems that not only expel or filter harmful air but maintain comfortable temperatures. There is a lot to consider in these types of problems, and without some sort of assistance, it can be little more than guesswork. SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation does a great job of calculating the types of parameters we are used […]

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SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation: Radiation! A Follow-up Blog

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A few weeks ago, I published a blog that discusses the basics of radiation in SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation. The link to the blog can be found here. In that blog, we used a very simple example of a one square meter plate to demonstrate the accuracy of SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation compared to well-established hand calculations. In short, a 1 square meter plate with an emissivity of 1 at 300 Kelvin should have a radiative heat transfer rate of 459.29 [W], […]

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Radiation in SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation

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I have been asked a lot recently about the radiation capabilities in Flow Simulation. No this isn’t the type of radiation depicted in the recent smash hit Chernobyl on HBO. In our case, we are concerned about electromagnetic (EM) radiation. In particular, the capability of EM radiation to transmit heat energy. Of the 3 modes of heat transfer (conduction, convection, and radiation), radiative transfer is perhaps the most overlooked in simulation. I decided to go into a bit more detail […]

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Calculation of Abnormal Springs with SOLIDWORKS Simulation

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In mechanical applications, springs are very common. Anything from spaceships to consumer products is likely to have a spring in it somewhere. For most purposes, springs can be expressed mathematically with a “stiffness” value often denoted “K.” This stiffness is simply a relationship between the force needed to generate a specific displacement from the spring, Force= K * Displacement. When buying springs, usually the supplier or manufacturer will provide data about the spring’s stiffness value. However, the use of common […]

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Weld Analysis in SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Connector Series

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I have been asked a lot lately about how SOLIDWORKS Simulation can help with weld analysis. Welding is a crucial joining method in many designs. However, the actual welding process is quite complex as is the resulting material microstructure. The heat affected zones (HAZ) in welds are a big consideration, and SOLIDWORKS wrote a very good blog about approximating weld distortion due to the HAZ. In this blog, we are going to ignore that microstructure phenomenon and focus more on […]

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SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Electronics Cooling Part 3: Heat Pipes

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Welcome to part 3 of the blog covering the added capability the Electronics Cooling Module offers to SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation. If you have not done so yet, I recommend reading Part 1 and Part 2. In these previous blogs, we talked about Joule heating, improved PCB definitions, Two Resistor Components and more. This final blog in the series is reserved for the Heat Pipe functionality included in the Electronics Cooling Module. Heat pipes are a critical component in any modern […]

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SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Electronics Cooling Part 2: PCB & Two-resistor Components

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Welcome back to this discussion about the SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation Electronics Cooling Module. Find a link to Part 1 Here. In part one we discussed Joule heating. Using my neat CATI Printed Circuit board model we were able to simulate the heat generated from electrical power flowing through PCB busses. In that study, we left the heat generated by the IC chip out of the analysis. The purpose of this blog is to take the analysis a bit further. We […]

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SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation: Joule Heating

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SOLIDWORKS Flow simulation is a fantastic tool for simulating internal or external fluid flows. It also features very robust conjugate heat transfer capabilities; including conduction, convection, and radiation. The combination of these capabilities has made SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation the go-to program to simulate cooling electronic components. It does this fantastically right out of the box, but with the addition of the Electronics Cooling Module, it gets even better! Today I’d like to cover one of the flagship capabilities of the […]

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