Flow Simulation: Computational Domain Editing Part 2 – Periodicity

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

In Part 1 of this blog series, I covered the SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation computational domain symmetry condition setting to reduce the size of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problem to be solved. The result is a decreased solution time and required computer memory. This blog will show how another computational domain condition, periodicity, can be used in those situations where you have a pattern of identical components in the flow field. I’ll continue to use the Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk stealth […]

Read More

Calculation of Abnormal Springs with SOLIDWORKS Simulation

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

In mechanical applications, springs are very common. Anything from spaceships to consumer products is likely to have a spring in it somewhere. For most purposes, springs can be expressed mathematically with a “stiffness” value often denoted “K.” This stiffness is simply a relationship between the force needed to generate a specific displacement from the spring, Force= K * Displacement. When buying springs, usually the supplier or manufacturer will provide data about the spring’s stiffness value. However, the use of common […]

Read More

Injection Locations: Two Ways to Apply

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

Injection locations are a hot topic in our blog series including Make Your Mark on Injection Locations in SOLIDWORKS Plastics Simulation, and SOLIDWORKS 2019 What’s New Plastics Geometry Based Boundary Conditions. I wanted to expand on this topic yet again and discuss the difference between Geometry Based injection locations, and Mesh Dependent injection locations. Both Geometry Based, and Mesh Dependent injection locations do the same thing. The injection locations give the software a point of entry for the molten plastic […]

Read More

SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Reaction Moment Using Solid Element

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

When running an FEA on an assembly or large part the first thing we normally do is reduce the complexity of the geometry so that the calculation times remain short. At times this would mean that we would get rid of the main structure and only calculate the reaction forces and moments on a subassembly or smaller region of a part. While doing this we may end up using tetrahedron elements, or solid elements, to mesh our geometry. Solid elements […]

Read More

SOLIDWORKS Plastics – Cooling Analysis Basics

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

If you are in the business of designing plastic parts, you are probably well aware of the multistep injection molding process. SOLIDWORKS Plastics can simulate this process. Three different offerings (Standard – Professional – Premium) allow increasing levels of functionality. All of them can simulate the plastic injection flow stage; Plastics Professional adds the pack stage, and other capabilities and Plastics Premium includes the calculations related to the cool and warp stages. One thing you might not know about this simulation […]

Read More

SOLIDWORKS Motion Joint Forces

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

Simulation tools are meant to recreate reality but sometimes this is easier said than done! If you don’t accurately capture real world behavior in your setup, you will likely miss an important part of the solution or get results that are highly inaccurate. This can be the case for SOLIDWORKS Motion joint forces. In construction industry excavators, dual hydraulic actuators are sometimes used to support high loads and distribute them through the main structure, as for the main boom shown […]

Read More

How to display part level simulation results in SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

There will be a point when you have a cluttered assembly and viewing your SOLIDWORKS simulation results can be difficult. In the past I have resorted to hiding and showing certain parts just to get a good view of the stress or displacement results. This method can be tedious but effective. Let’s take a look at the process. In Figure 1 we have an assembly that has all its parts shown. Now if you want to show the stress results […]

Read More

SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Nonuniform Force and Pressure Loading in Spherical Coordinate Systems

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

In previous posts “SOLIDWORKS Simulation – Nonuniform Force and Pressure Loading“, and “SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Nonuniform Force and Pressure Loading in Cylindrical Coordinate Systems” I showed how to apply boundary conditions based on Cartesian and cylindrical coordinate systems (CS). I varied the water pressure with depth on the walls of an aquarium in the first post. In the second, I varied the wind load on a horizontal storage tank. Let’s now look at nonuniform pressure loading using the third option, a […]

Read More

SOLIDWORKS Simulation: Result Plot Tips

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

The SOLIDWORKS simulation solved successfully! It must’ve been setup correctly or else it would’ve given an error and, even better, my max stress is below yield! Next problem, please. Pump the brakes! Neither of the statements you just read are indicators of a successful stress study. When the study solves our job, as analysts, this is just beginning. We must analyze the results plots to confirm that the stresses we see are real and not stress singularities and we must […]

Read More

SOLIDWOKS Simulation – Nonuniform Force and Pressure Loading

EmailFacebookLinkedInTwitterShare

In a blog post from February, I enlisted the help of the Bluehead Fairy Wrasse to describe the importance of good meshing practices in SOLIDWORKS Simulation. Now we’ll check the integrity of her new home, a 29-gallon aquarium, using the nonuniform pressure load available in SOLIDWORKS Simulation to make sure the tank can withstand the stress of the water pressure. As you know, fluid pressure varies with depth, so using the default constant pressure would generate an unrealistic load. Figure […]

Read More